© 2023 by Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III

In The News

Black Churches, Powerful Cultural Forces, Set Their Sights on Food Security

The Baltimore-based Black Church Food Security Network is building a community-centered food system to combat ‘food apartheid' by connecting Black farmers with historically African-American churches.

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Can the church use faith to influence eating and exercise?

Baltimore restaurateur John Shields joins Dan for a conversation with the Rev. Heber Brown III, pastor at Pleasant Hope Baptist Church, about the Black Church Food Security Network. This is an effort to use churches to influence their members to not only eat healthier foods, but to eat what they grow or what African-American farmers grow.

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Rev. Dr. Brown Guest on National Television

Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III was a guest on MSNBC's The Beat with Ari Melber highlighting the work of African American farmers.

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Black network’s farm-to-church movement brings fresh food to Baltimore

After waving his black handkerchief and preaching a passionate sermon about Doubting Thomas, the apostle who initially refused to believe in Jesus’ resurrection, the Rev. Heber Brown III sat in the study of his Baptist church, switched gears and started talking with conviction about eggs.

And not just any eggs. Free-range eggs that he had ferried up Interstate 95 the previous day to extend the work of his Black Church Food Security Network.

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Change Maker & Risk Taker: Heber Brown

The Forum for Theological Exploration spotlighted Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III as one of the innovative religious leaders in the country.

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The Forum for Theological Exploration spotlighted Rev. Dr. Heber Brown, III as one of the innovative religious leaders in the country.

Take a look...

How “Greens, Beets, and Tomatoes” Turned Around This Historically Black Church

A few years ago, the Rev. Dr. Heber Brown III, the pastor of Baltimore’s historically African American Pleasant Hope Baptist Church, noticed a problem in his congregation: Many of the members were suffering from diet-related diseases. The problem is larger than just Pleasant Hope: About 13 percent of African American adults have diabetes, and an astonishing 40 percent experience high blood pressure.

Brown knew his community needed healthier food, but fresh produce was too expensive.

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